custom term papers

Archive

Posts Tagged ‘law research paper’

How to Write a Good Research Proposal for a Law Paper

August 27th, 2015 Comments off

data entryOnce you’re at the research proposal writing stage, it’s good to keep in mind that the process requires the author to be familiar with the methodology of research as well as legal method course. The research proposal for the law paper should be submitted to the university supervisors within the set deadline – make sure to meet one.

First thing to remember is that the law research proposal must include not more than 2500 words. But this number does not include bibliography and footnotes. The cover page must include the title, name, registration, completion year, word count, supervisor’s name and the date.

As soon as you have the topic of the research proposal, allow yourself enough time to identify the specific problem that you will be researching though stating an overall question. The topic could be the broad segment of law, but make sure to choose the one that is related to the area you like best.

As for the proposal structure, there is no guidance regarding the format of proposal, as well as how its content should look like. Typically, it’s the supervisor that decides in what order the Research Methodology and theoretical part should be placed.

A law paper proposal may include either background or intro, or both. This will depend on your supervisor’s way of thinking. But the typical thing about this part is that it sets out a broad, but hooking start to the area of research being performed. As a rule, it is not long, but it includes catchy information that presents your topic to the readers. For example, the intro of the research proposal of the law paper may look like this: ‘Article 51 of the United Nations Charter reveals that an armed attack originally comes from the other American state. However, the state practice proved that there were special cases, when the attacks were justified by the states on the territory of the other in the name of self-defence, when this very attack was caused by a non-state actor. It is necessary to mention that customary and treaty international law recognize the right of the state to take some measures to stop the danger that has been posed to the citizens and the state.’

The law paper research proposal requires you to state the problem you work on. It usually includes a concise matter that has arisen in a certain context and consequently must be properly investigated and the right solution recommended at the end. To cut the story, what you are about to research is what you have to describe in this part.  Take a look at the following example: ‘The problem that comes up lies in whether the self-defence right should be exercised legally in the event of the armed attack that happened against the American state by a non-state actor. That is, the problem is whether the American state should be responsible for the international law on regard to the armed attacks by the non-state actor working form its own region and thus become the object of the retaliatory attack by the victim territory in exercise of the self-defense right.’

It is recommended to limit your research proposal to a single legal question. The following questions may serve as an example for your own project: What do we call ‘the armed attack’? Does the Article 51 of the Charter of the United Nations consider an attack by the non-state actors as the armed attack? Does the attack made by the non-state actors relate to the armed attack? Make sure to choose one of the alternative research questions or work out your own.

Research Paper on Legal Consequences of Plagiarism

July 8th, 2015 Comments off

thief illustrationWhen the question is about the plagiarism consequences, they can be professional, personal, legal and ethical. When assigned with the task to complete a research paper about the consequences of plagiarism, make sure to focus on each type of plagiarism within the body of the project.

When working on the introductive section, remember that it should not exceed two pages. The purpose of this segment of the paper is to inform your readers on the rationale behind the project, with the intention to later expand on it. Thus, your reader will have an opportunity to understand as well as appreciate all of your objectives.

This is the time, when you’re supposed to be working on the body of the research paper. Begin your research paper with the statement that plagiarists can include not only students, but also experienced professionals, academics, journalists, authors and many others. However, with the special plagiarism detection systems that are nowadays available for free use, all plagiarists can be caught at an alarming rate.

Start investigating the consequences of plagiarism, one after another. The very first legal consequence of plagiarism is destroyed student’s reputation. Once the student is accused of plagiarism, he can be suspended or even expelled. Plagiarism allegations can probably cause the student to switch from one college to the other. The thing is that colleges, high schools and the other educational establishments are very strict when the question related to plagiarism. A lot of schools make sure to suspend students for the very first violation.

Make sure to mention that not only student’s reputation, but also the name of a business person can be blackened. A public figure may face with the fact that plagiarism will be there in his or her career for good. Include the possible consequences for the representatives of business area. These may be getting fired from the present position as well as problems with finding a new respectable job.

The other type or legal consequences of plagiarism are related to the completely destroyed academic reputation.  Once the academic career is scarred with any kind of plagiarism allegations, it may be ruined. Taking into account that publishing is an integral part of a successful academic career, make sure to search for the famous persons who have lost the ability to publish due to the plagiarism allegations.

The other chapter of the research paper on the topic should include legal percussions of plagiarism. They can be pretty serious. Make sure to state that people are not allowed to use another person’s written material without proper reference or citation. Search for the related laws to support your statements.

A highly egregious type of plagiarism that should be mentioned within the paper is the plagiarized research. In case the research is performed within the medical area, the plagiarism consequences can mean the loss of lives of the others.

Before you write the research paper about the plagiarism consequences, make sure to learn about plagiarism itself. Find out what exactly constitutes plagiarism and how to avoid it.

Law and Order in London in the Late Nineteenth Century

March 29th, 2010 No comments

The biggest changes in London’s law and order set up took place in the nineteenth century, around the time of the Jack the Ripper murders. This essay is going to discuss the role of the police, how and why the police force changed, the reasons behind it, and what difference these changes made to society.

Law and order in Britain consisted of two police forces in 1800, the Bow Street Runners and the Thames River police force. The forces were under constant threat because of the rapidly growing population, and the lack of sufficient constables. In London in 1829 there were 450 constables and 4000 watchmen, compared to 1.5 million inhabitants of London. Watchmen and parish constables patrolled the streets of London, who kept an eye out for trouble, and prevented disturbances and robberies. They were probably quite effective, because they knew the local area and the local troublemakers well, but little is known about them. However, these officers could not deal with big disturbances, like riots. At this time, there were frequent Chartist uprisings in London, which the police were completely unable to control. The Industrial Revolution (1750-1850) also caused an increase in homicide, robbery, theft and burglary, which added to the demand for a more effective police force.
Read more…

Law Research Paper Ideas

October 20th, 2009 No comments

Law research paper ideas can be complicated in developing the right topic for your paper. Research papers require a lot of work and dedication to discovering information that is relevant to your sources and demonstrates strong thinking skills. The best ideas for law research may be anything from demonstrating the patterns in law changes related to the changes in society. For example, laws tend to reflect the society around them; however, the laws may change based on society or in response to a recognized need in society. Every research developed for law papers must demonstrate thoughtful consideration of the laws you wish to demonstrate or the particular coursework you are studying.

Additionally, consider strictly, what is directly related to courses and cases you have reviewed over the years of education. Every type of law and case you study is essential to making the necessary connections between the things you learn and the things you will have to understand after graduation. Every legal aspect has a great number of possible ideas, including a number of historical references that can be applied to successfully supporting your topic sentence. You can have the best research paper for your law assignment if you review the different coursework you have studied and apply the correct references and research. Read more…

Differences between US and Russian Constitutions

September 10th, 2009 No comments

Russia and the United States have a few similarities and differences that are, or are not, written directly into their constitutions. One of the main areas in which this can be seen are within each country’s version of civil liberties, rights, and duties. The first amendment of the United State’s constitution includes such provisions as the freedom of religion. This is represented within the 28th Article of the Russian Constitution. The main difference between these two articles can be seen in the U.S. constitution, it is stated within; “no law respecting an establishment of religion.” In the Russian’s Article 28 it is stated much more specifically as “freedom of conscience and freedom of religion […] or to profess none.” It also has Article 14 to ensure that the state is secular and all religious associations are kept separate from government. This difference has made for a bit of controversy in the U.S., as can be seen here in La Crosse and elsewhere in the country concerning the Ten Commandments on government property.

Article 29 in the Russian constitution states the equivalent of the United State’s freedom of speech. Again, the main difference is the wording. The Russian constitution is much more exact with its language. For example, it specifies thought and directly bans propaganda of social, racial, national, religious, or language supremacy. Article 29 section 2 is also another area not represented as explicitly in the United State’s constitution. Their version of freedom of the press is very similar, yet the Russian version is again more detailed in its wording. Read more…

Legalization of Marijuana Research Paper

September 3rd, 2009 1 comment

The scent of marijuana enters the air as Chris Smith, a forty-three year-old woman from Trabuco Canyon, exhales a hit from her pipe. Smith has multiple sclerosis and credits smoking marijuana for relieving her muscle spasms and stopping the pain (Romney 1). Because Smith and many others like her smoke the drug for medicinal purposes, medical marijuana should be made legal in the United States. Many people in the United States are avid users of the drug because of pain or discomfort from pre-existing conditions. Dupont states that “marijuana, also spelled marihuana, is a drug made from the dried leaves and flowering tops of the hemp plant” (Dupont 201). The drug has many nicknames including grass, pot, weed, chronic and cannabis (Dupont 201).

Even though the drug has been available for thousands of years, it hasn’t been legal that long. Dupont says, “In the United States, marijuana use has been prohibited by state and local laws since the early 1900?s, and by federal law since 1937. In spite of these laws use of the drug became widespread during the 1960’s and 1970’s, especially among young people” (Dupont 201). The road to legal marijuana has been shortening over time though. Dupont states that “between 1969 and 1978, the federal government and many state governments reduced the criminal charge for possession of small amounts of marijuana from a felony to a misdemeanor” (Dupont 203). Certain states however went even further when they “substituted fines for jail sentences” (Dupont 204). But medical marijuana is not a legal drug in the US. Read more…

Law Research Paper Topics

August 31st, 2009 No comments

Writing Law research papers on different topics related Law studies is a very popular activity among college and university students and their professors. There are thousands of Law research paper topics to be found in the global network. Free resources can offer a great variety of good Law research paper topics, but it is still difficult to find interesting topics for writing an effective research paper for Law classes.

Here’s is a list of the most popular Law research topics to be properly used in writing your research paper:

  • European Supremacy Law
  • Comparative Law
  • Competition Law
  • Employment Law
  • Company Law
  • Business Law
  • International Law
  • The Conflict of Divine Law and Human Law
  • Philosophy of Law
  • History of Law
  • Should pornography be limited by law?
  • Should laws regarding minimum wage be revised?
  • Should genetic engineering be restricted by law?
  • Should academic freedom for students and teachers be limited by law? Read more…

Employment Law Research Paper

August 26th, 2009 No comments

In the recent past, employees of large, stable firms and workers with valuable skills had reason to believe their jobs were secure as long as they adhered to company policies and performed satisfactorily. Many retired from their positions with sizable pensions accrued over many years with an employer. As surely as 401(k) plans have replaced company pensions, longevity has been traded for high turnover by both firms determined to stay competitive and workers seeking greater opportunity. However, when the economy weakens, workers become less willing to job-hop; security is much more important than new challenges. Businesses often react to a downturn by trimming nonessential people from the payroll – employee cost is often the largest controllable company expense and the first place budget cuts are made. Companies that claim “our people are our greatest asset” can save substantially by reducing their “greatest asset” and splitting up the workload among those remaining.

Though the previous generation seems to have enjoyed greater job security than the present one1, in fact jobs in the United States have never been what many Americans would consider “secure.” Many believed then and many now think they cannot be fired except for a good reason, including poor performance and stealing, but in reality ours is an “at-will” country. Though the economic rationale for company terminations cited above would be unpleasant but acceptable to a large number of workers – after all, the firm has to make money to pay its employees – such a good reason for termination is not at all necessary in most situations. Read more…

How a Bill Becomes a Law

August 10th, 2009 No comments

America is known as the country of freedom, but if we had no established laws, Americans would not be as prosperous as we are today. The process of making laws, known as the legislative process, is governed by rules, laws and procedures. Although the legislative process is long and complex, all laws begin as simple ideas. When a member of Congress has an idea for a new law they present it as a bill, which is the most common type of legislation. The path of a bill, from the time it is just an idea to the time it arrives at the President’s desk for approval, is paved with many detours. A bill must be passed through both houses of congress, the House of Representatives or the Senate, in identical form, before it can be made a law. This is achieved through a step-by-step process that begins in either house.

When a bill originates in the House of Representatives the idea is presented to a representative. The Representative decides whether or not they want to sponsor the bill and introduce it to the rest of the house. If the Representative decides not to sponsor the bill, he sets it aside and does nothing, which is known as tabling the bill. Eventually the bill is forgotten about and dies. If they choose to sponsor it, they present the bill to the Chief Clerk of the House. The chief assigns the bill a number to keep track of it through this process. Then the bill is sent to the U.S. Government Printing Office to make copies and is returned to the house. The copies are dispersed to the rest of the Representatives and the bill goes through its first reading. The speaker then assigns a committee to further review the bill. The committee will put the bill through public hearings and work sessions where revisions and additions can be made. If there are additions made to the bill, it is reprinted and includes the new amendments. After it is reviewed the Committee Chair signs it. The revised bill goes through a second reading, and finally a third reading before the house can vote on it. The bill must receive the majority of the houses votes to be passed on to the other house. Read more…

Megan’s Law in Australia

July 24th, 2009 No comments

John Lewthwaite is a man who had been charged and convicted for the murder of five-year-old Nicole Hann in 1974. Lewthwaite, who was nineteen at the time, had fantasised about abducting and raping Nicole’s then nine-year-old brother. Young Nicole awoke one afternoon as Lewthwaite broke into her home. He stabbed her seventeen times. Lewthwaite was released back into the community after serving twenty-five years of his prison sentence. The community he took residence in was fearful and outraged; their main concern was for the safety of their children.

Good morning/afternoon Miss Wiggins and girls. Ours is an increasingly dangerous society with increases in both the malevolency and the rate of crime. Part of the problem lies in abuse of our advancing technology and media inducing increase in tolerance of popular-cultural interests such as violent movies, music, video games influencing today’s youths to commit crimes we have never imagined. This generation is in need of limits and boundaries, legal guidelines that enable individuals to achieve social cohesion. We are a generation that lives in constant fear. The rate of child sex crimes is on the rise. Parents of young children now live in fear that their child may also fall a victim to sexual crime. In 1993 to 1994, there were 4392 children who were believed to have been involved in substantiated cases of child sex abuse whereby substantiated means there is reasonable cause to believe that the child has been or is being abused. One Australian study in 1988 estimated that twenty-eight percent of girls and nine percent of boys had been involved in some form of sexual abuse in Australia. Child abuse includes crimes such as child sexual assault, child sexual victimisation, child exploitation, child sexual misuse, child molestation, child sexual maltreatment and child rape. All of which are criminal offences listed under the Criminal Code of Queensland. These crimes pose serious threat to our society. Not only are children amongst the most vulnerable of groups in the community, they are also the next generation of adults. Statistics show that in most cases, convicted paedophiles were found likely to have been victims of sex crimes as children. Therefore more must be done now to break this vicious cycle of immorality.

This afternoon, in light of time constraints I will be focusing on one particular area of law related to child sex crimes that is in need of reform; the treatment of “rehabilitated” or “paroled” child sex criminals in relation to Megan’s law in the US and whether or not such legislation is appropriate for the Australian society. Read more…